2020 MLB Draft

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  • #129735
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    Agree DM

    #129736
    Avatarbccran
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    Also agree DM.

    #129743
    AvatarDavid Martin
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    “Top 100 Prospects” on MLB Network right now.
    It will be repeated a couple of times tonight and Saturday morning

    #129759
    Avatarbccran
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    Nice thing about drafting a SS, is they can maybe be moved over to 3B if they have some pop, and can easily be moved to 2B.

    3rd baseman can maybe be moved to OF. The move of DeJong to SS is rare for a third baseman.

    A second baseman is a second baseman. Just like a first baseman is a first baseman.

    Agree?

    #129760
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    I can’t think of a player that came up as a second baseman and got moved to another position, and stayed there. Skip Schumaker moved back and forth between the outfield and second base, but he came up as an outfielder.

    Speaking of middle infielders, Ed Howard is my favorite for the Cardinals to draft in the first round. I know he’s only a high school kid. I think he’s worth the gamble. The scouting reports and videos on him lessen the gamble. You don’t have to be a scout to see the talent this kid has going for him. I hope he’s still there at the 21rst pick and the Cardinals call him.

    #129761
    AvatarDavid Martin
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    serious doubts he’ll drop to 21 but that would be nice.
    I think a lot of us wouldn’t mind seeing that.

    #129762
    Avatarbccran
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    Slot is $3,132,300. Worth the gamble for in reality a high school junior?

    #129763
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    What if the high school player was Ozzie Smith or Barry Larkin?

    #129764
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    Big decision. Do you take a risk with Howard, who hasn’t played above the junior in high school level, or make a surer bet on a Mlodzinski (or another top college pitcher), who may be another
    Haren, Wacha, or Hudson type?
    A ton more to go on and analyze with those college pitchers. Plus, they can be used as trade chits if necessary in the next year or two.

    #129765
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    I’m hoping that all the hype about this draft being so deep in quality pitching will cause Howard to drop to 21 (and also hoping that they take him if he does).

    bccran – You’re rationale makes all kinds of sense. But we’re stocked with quality pitching, so if we’re going to take a chance on a player, now would be the time, IMO.

    #129770
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    Mud, if you can get a quality trade chip to turn into a Lindor, isn’t that a better choice? A quality starting pitcher can always be used to acquire something that is not as risky.

    #129773
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    What you say makes sense except that players like Lindor are expensive plus we didn’t get to watch him come up through our system. Part of my bias for taking Howard is that I like what I saw in his video. His scouting report says he has ‘quick hands’ and even I can see that in his video. Also, I like his defense. He looks smooth, if not graceful, to me. There’s are reasons that he might not last to the 21rst round. If we take a pitcher that late in the draft, there’s a pretty good chance that he turns into a decent, middle of the rotation guy. It’s nice to have that kind of prospect. We need that kind of prospect. But, in this case, given our need for middle infielders, I’d be willing to take a chance on Howard.

    #129778
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    Middle Infielders in the system –

    Sosa – .291/.317/.783
    Schrock -.275/.374/.745

    Lopez – .262/.340/.776
    Ascanio – .267/.333/.711

    Martinez – .237/.309/.621
    Dunn – .247/.292/.629

    Perez – .269/.329/.654
    Diaz – .317/.346/.773

    Castillo – .249/.331/.646
    Williams – .218/.340/.622

    Gil – .262/.317/.736
    Redmond – .287/.382/.935

    Soto – .224/.333/.689
    Mendoza – .284/.388/.790

    Watch out for Imeldo Diaz. He turned it on in 2019. He hit .316 at Peoria and .346 after his promotion to Palm Beach.
    Has played SS, 2B, and 3B.

    #129788
    Avatarbccran
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    What’s a good guess on the 7 draftees? 4 pitchers and 3 position players? 5 college players and 2 high schoolers?

    #129789
    AvatarDavid Martin
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    teams, the White Sox included, will have the opportunity to sign an unlimited number of undrafted players for $20,000 apiece. But the best of the undrafted bunch might choose to delay their professional careers until economic circumstances are more favorable. High schoolers set to enter the minor leagues might instead opt to play college ball. College juniors who don’t get drafted might return to their schools.

    And then there’s the sheer reality of the level economic playing field when it comes to signing those undrafted players. The White Sox, just like every other team, will have to convince the top remaining talent that they should sign up with them instead of 29 other options.

    In other words, in those five rounds in which teams will actually be able to select players, the pressure’s on.

    ^ is obviously from a guy writing about the white sox but pertains to all teams. No doubt….
    THE PRESSURE IS ON

    #129790
    AvatarDavid Martin
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    new article from Anne Rogers, quotes from Randy Flores:

    https://www.mlb.com/cardinals/news/cardinals-2020-mlb-draft-preview

    • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by AvatarDavid Martin.
    #129792
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    Good article

    #129793
    Avatarbccran
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    Seems like #21 is going to be a college pitcher.

    #129794
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    Fine with me…Carmen Mlodzinski’s uniform # with the Gamecocks is 21. Maybe an omen.

    #129795
    AvatarDavid Martin
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    or Louisville’s Bobby Miller since he already has Cardinals on his uni. JK. 🙂

    #129797
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    Mudville –

    Yes, we’re stocked with pitchers. But if we draft another stud pitcher at #21 we can trade a pitcher or two for a middle infielder who’s a lot further along in development than high schooler Howard. Maybe a really good prospect that’s at the AA or AAA level. If we can bring in an O’Neill that way, we can bring in an even more talented middle infielder that way. The Mariners recognized Marco’s talent.

    #129798
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    Can’t have too much top-line pitching.

    #129799
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    Here is a recent article on Mlodzinski and the draft from the Carolina point of view.

    #129800
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    South Carolina pitcher Carmen Mlodzinski committed to the baseball program wanting to be a two-way player with shortstop being his other position. It didn’t take long for him to become a pitcher only, and it also didn’t take him long to become a major contributor.

    Mlodzinski threw 45 2/3 innings as a freshman but threw only 36 innings the next two years combined for the Gamecocks. He leaves the program having developed an incredible amount – into likely a first round pick in the MLB Draft – but with a feeling that there was more to accomplish.

    “You can definitely say it feels incomplete,” Mlodzinski said on Friday during a Zoom meeting with reporters of his South Carolina career.

    “It sucks having two seasons taken away from you when you want to go out there and perform to the best of your ability and be around the best friends that you’ve built at your school. It’s something I’ve had to deal with, tried to deal with it as a positive, be optimistic but it’s definitely tough. At 20, 21 years old, that’s where you want to go out and compete. Having that taken away was definitely hard.”

    The “positive” spin that Mlodzinski can put on not throwing much for the Gamecocks is longevity. He lost probably at least 100 innings that he would have pitched over two seasons, which means there’s fewer miles on his engine, so to speak.

    “Hopefully the innings I’m missing now are innings that I can put on the back end of my career,” Mlodzinski said. “Keep my arm that much more fresh. At the end of the day, I want to play baseball as long as I can.”

    Mlodzinski committed to the former South Carolina coaching staff, and they knew he would ultimately become a pitcher. And so did Mark Kingston’s coaching staff. He worked with former pitching coach Jerry Meyers his first fall on campus, until Skylar Meade took over in the fall.

    The only year he featured on the mound at Hilton Head High School came as a senior when he threw 42 1/3 innings with a 1.49 earned run average and a 7-2 record. He had 65 strikeouts and 21 walks allowing only 25 hits. To put those numbers into perspective, there were at least 34 pitchers in the state who threw more than 50 innings that same season and a handful who threw over 70 innings.

    So Mlodzinski had a lot to learn about becoming an SEC-ready pitcher when he got to South Carolina, and he ultimately developed into a player expected to put pen to paper on a professional contract that gets him at least a $2 million signing bonus.

    “From zero to where I am now,” Mlodzinski said about his development at South Carolina. “I came to Carolina with just about zero pitching experience. I probably threw 50 career innings as a high schooler. I went from ground zero to where I’m at now. There was definitely a lot of development in three years here, and not just on the pitching side, but the mental side that Coach Meade has helped me out with. That’s when I felt my career took off was when I really grasped that. There was a lot of growth here in three years, and I’m really thankful for it.”

    Mlodzinski, largely on his Cape Cod League performance last summer, entered the year as a preseason All-American. He went 2-1 with a 2.84 earned run average and 22 strikeouts in 25 1/3 innings in a shortened junior season. Those aren’t jaw-dropping numbers, but he’s done enough to project as a late first round pick.

    Would he have achieved that level of success if he stayed at shortstop?

    #129802
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    Crochet has hit 100 on the gun.
    Billy the Kid Wagner clone?

Viewing 25 posts - 426 through 450 (of 941 total)
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