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TCN 2020 St. Louis Cardinals Prospect #35 – Steven Gingery

photo: Steven Gingery (Bruce Thorson/USA TODAY Sports)

The Cardinal Nation’s top 50 prospect countdown for 2020 continues with a promising left-hander who, two years into his career, hasn’t yet been healthy enough to pitch. FREE article.


2019 rank Pos. DOB Ht. Wt. Bat Thw Signed Round R5/Opt MLB debut
29 LHP 9 23 97 6-1 210 R L 2018 4th 2021 2022

Link to Steven Gingery’s player page at The Cardinal Nation, with additional biography and history information.

Steven Gingery


Selected 2019 stats

Tm W L ERA FIP G GS SV IP H ER HR BB SO AVG WHIP G/AO BABIP
GCL 0 1 13.50 5.01 1 1 0 0.2 1 1 0 1 1 0.333 3.00 0 0.500

TCN Scouting Grade: 4, Risk: high (click here to review scales)


Staff comments (individual rankings in parentheses)

Message board community (39): The Message Board Community, relying on scouting reports, his considerable college achievements at Texas Tech and the TCN rankings, which placed Gingery #37 in August, selected Gingery #35. Last season, the Community placed him at #32 against the overall ranking of #29.

This year, 14Nyquist first placed him at #30 and SoonerinNC was right behind at #31. mudville was very vocal regarding Gingery writing, “2019 would have effectively been his first season since he was still recovering from Tommy John during all of 2018. The Cardinals, for the most part, seem to follow a program of strengthening a pitcher in the pitcher’s first year. He’s a lefty, and if he’s healthy next season, he could move up 15 – 20 places in this ranking.”

Grenadier noted “This is really my favorite part (of the process) – to see who people like and why, this far down on the list.”

Honestly, I can’t see how anyone reading this cannot be excited about seeing what Steven can deliver. He could be the bargain that we’ve been waiting for. That said, I don’t have any good idea where the organization will place him to start 2020. – John Baker


Derek Shore (37): Over a long 18-month recovery period, Gingery made his long-awaited return from Tommy John surgery in 2019, albeit in only ⅔ of an inning for the Gulf Coast League Cardinals in his professional debut.

That was all 2019 had in store for Gingery. He would not pitch the rest of the season as it appeared he had another physical setback with no update on his status.

From a scouting perspective, the lefty had what many scouts considered the best changeup in college baseball prior to elbow surgery. It has excellent deception and late fade as it dives below bats to induce swings and misses.

It’s an easy plus pitch that earns some 70 grades from evaluators. His changeup and above-average control are pivotal to his success on the bump.

That makes it all the more important for him to spot his fringe-average 88-91 mph fastball and an average curveball he can throw for strikes.

Gingery draws comparisons to Jason Vargas and Marco Gonzales with his effortless delivery, above-average control and track record for success. He was expected to be one of the safest bets in his draft class before going down with Tommy John.

Assuming he is healthy entering 2020, Gingery is an ideal back-end starter and he’s advanced enough to be placed at either Low-A Peoria or High-A Palm Beach to open the season.


Brian Walton (34): The Cardinals need left-handed pitching (who doesn’t?), and Gingery could fit the bill. Then again, he has yet to contribute and the organization went ahead and spent even more to get another left-handed starter in the 2019 draft, Zack Thompson.

My vote at no. 34 is less about any confidence in Gingery and more about my faith in him eroding more slowly than the others. The others could be right, though. The fact that Gingery improved four spots in our rankings year-to-year probably says more about the general state of pitching across the system than it does about him.

After all, it is two years into his career with nothing yet returned. The Cardinals spent $825,000, almost $400,000 over slot, to convince Gingery to spend his first-year as a professional rehabbing. It hasn’t gone well since, with just that one aborted July outing to open and close his 2019 season.

It would seem most likely that Gingery would have to head to Class-A if physically ready to open 2020. From there, one just has to hope he can make up for lost time. Not knowing the details of his medical diagnosis, and in fact having never seen him pitch live, make any further projection highly speculative.

I currently have Gingery’s scouting grade at “4”, a spot starter, with moderate work yet ahead to achieve it (“medium” risk). That is down from “5 medium” a year earlier. His mound results in 2020 could easily reverse this trend – if he can get his career train back on the rails.

Link to Gingery’s career stats


Our 2020 top 50 series continues

To see the entire list of top Cardinals prospects and remaining article schedule, click here. This includes the top 50 countdown and 11 in-depth, follow-up articles coming up at the rate of one article per day into January.

Most of them are exclusively for members of The Cardinal Nation. If you are not a member, join today so you do not miss out!

50 Days, 50 Nights, 50 St. Louis Cardinals Prospects – 2020

Also, please participate in the daily discussion about each prospect at The Cardinal Nation’s free message board.


Bonus for members of The Cardinal Nation

2019-2020 Cardinals Winter Ball Pitchers Report – November 22


Not yet a member?

If you enjoyed this article, please consider joining The Cardinal Nation to receive the most comprehensive coverage of the St. Louis Cardinals from the majors through the entire minor league system.

© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

TCN 2020 St. Louis Cardinals Prospect #40 – Juan Yepez

photo: Juan Yepez (Brian Walton/The Cardinal Nation)

The Cardinal Nation’s top 50 prospect countdown for 2020 continues with a corner infielder who expanded his versatility to include the outfield and rebounded with the bat to reach Double-A at the age of 21. FREE article.


2019 rank Pos. DOB Ht. Wt. Bat Thw Signed Round R5/Opt MLB debut
NR 1B 2 19 98 6-1 200 R R 2014 IFA (Atl) 2018 2022

Link to Juan Yepez’s player page at The Cardinal Nation, with additional biography and history information.

Juan Yepez


Selected 2019 stats

Tm AVG BABIP G AB R H 2B HR RBI BB SO SB wRC+ OBP SLG OPS
Peo 0.284 0.344 25 88 14 25 7 4 13 11 24 2 147 0.366 0.500 0.866
PB 0.275 0.312 29 102 16 28 4 4 20 10 21 1 136 0.351 0.431 0.782
Spr 0.231 0.263 17 52 8 12 2 2 10 5 14 0 85 0.288 0.385 0.673
Total 0.269 71 242 38 65 13 10 43 26 59 3 0.343 0.446 0.789

TCN Scouting Grade: 3.5, Risk: medium (click here to review scales)


Staff comments (individual rankings in parentheses)

Message board community (31): The community voters thought enough of Yepez’ potential/production to slot him into the #31 position for this season. Last year, the group had Yepez at #63. Two seasons ago, the now 21-year-old was in the TCN’s top 50 at #44.

Early support came from gscottar at #21, plus PugsleyAddams and Christopher Jeske in the #23-26 round. gscottar wrote: “I thought Yepez had a very solid year and the organization must have thought so also because he made it from Peoria all the way to Springfield. His numbers aren’t eye popping and he may or may not make it to St. Louis but he is a very steady, above average minor league player and at age 21 he still has time to make a name for himself.”

Jeske: “Generally speaking, Yepez has been promoted aggressively (reaching A in his age 18 season and AA in his age 21 season). In between, though, it’s been a little weird as he was assigned to A in each of his age 18-21 seasons. During this time his performance varied from positive (getting by offensively despite being young for his level and showing flashes of elite hitting ability) to negative (an extreme, prolonged slump in A+). This year he hit for more power mainly due to an increase in his HR/FB%.”

NigelT: “Twice he has had runs where he dominates with the bat. I believe he can hit, but he has never put it all together. How he is placed relative to (Luken) Baker will be interesting and telling.”

I’ve been pulling for Yepez since he was the return for Matt Adams. 2020 will be the Venezuelan’s sixth pro season and look for him to break camp at Springfield. He’ll need to step it up a notch or two to reach Memphis in 2020. – John Baker


Derek Shore (30): For the second straight season, Yepez backtracked to open a year. Not only did he not make a full-season club out of spring training, but stayed in extended spring training before reporting to Low-A Peoria in June for the third time.

The reason?

“The Cardinals told me, ‘We want to work with you in the outfield. We want you to be able to play more positions until there is an opening on a roster,’” Yepez said.

To his credit, Yepez performed well for the Chiefs, earning another promotion to High-A Palm Beach. This time, the Venezuelan native delivered for the Beach Birds, including 20 RBIs in 29 games. His OPS in his second shot at High-A was a credible .782.

That powered Yepez’ third promotion of the second half, with a move to Double-A Springfield for the final 17 games of the season. He OPS’d .673 and plated 10 runs.

“I gave my best every day and I ended up in Springfield,” Yepez said. “That was my goal for this year.”

Yepez credited former Cardinals all-star Ryan Ludwick and Gulf Coast League Cardinals hitting coach Joey Hawkins with improving his hitting. He said when he was promoted to Palm Beach last year – the duo wanted him to spread out his legs and lower his hands in his stance because his hands were too high and legs too narrow.

Yepez said he spent the offseason and part of extended working on that.

“I felt comfortable with my stance, my hands, my legs and the position I’m hitting in,” Yepez said. “I did better things with those adjustments.”

Springfield manager Joe Kruzel liked what he saw in Yepez during the season.

“In a very limited look, he is very confident in the batter’s box,” Kruzel said. “He is very balanced. He has a simple approach it appears. He is also capable of running into some balls and putting a charge in them. He can also play more than one position, so he can play left or right. He can first or third. That gives him a little flexibility.

“He is intriguing in that regard. He looks real comfortable in the batter’s box. Real confident. Since he has been up, he has done a really nice job in a short time.”

From a scouting standpoint, Yepez’ raw power stands out the most. He features above-average raw power that has yet to fully translate into games.

Scouts say he has a natural ability to drive the ball that can’t be taught, but he’s still working on his hitting approach to put himself in hitters’ counts more frequently.

Yepez explained where he is at now in regards to his plate discipline.

“When I’m in a good spot and I’m hot, I can recognize pitches in and out of the strike zone,” Yepez said. “I’m laying off the balls and swinging at strikes. When I’m hot at the plate, I can lay off those balls. When I get in trouble, I start swinging at those pitches out of the zone.

“That is one of the main things. I’m trying to swing at strikes and get some walks, too.”

The biggest issue surrounding Yepez is his future defensive home. While he may not profile as an everyday player, his two main positions are first and third base.

He also saw time at left field and right field in 2019.

“At the beginning, it was tough,” Yepez said. “I didn’t know where I was supposed to go and where I was supposed to be. I have to say thanks to all my teammates from extended to Double-A, helping me. All the coaches helped me. It was tough at the beginning, but it got easier and easier.

“Out there, I was just trying to catch the ball and throw it in the right spot. It’s different, but I will be working on it in the offseason to get better.”

Yepez should return to Springfield to start 2020.

Going forward, his goals are simple.

“I want to get stronger,” Yepez said. “I want to work on my arm and defense in the outfield and the infield. I just want to keep hitting and do the same as I was doing this year with the adjustments of my hands and legs. All that.”


Brian Walton (54): Well, I didn’t get the news of the Yepez train leaving the station. Now, I know that may seem odd at first blush, since I named him TCN’s system-wide Comeback Player of the Year for 2019. Just remember that these rankings are about career, not a single season. Further, to be a comeback qualifier, one must have gone from a significant low to a major high. In prospect rankings, consistency is important.

TCN’s 2019 Cardinals Comeback Player of the Year

As noted, Yepez was ranked no. 44 on our top 50 two seasons ago but went unranked last year. I am not convinced that he is a better prospect now, two years older but just one level higher than where he was assigned a month into the 2018 season.

This past season, Yepez could not escape extended spring training until June. I get that he was learning the outfield, but his very rough-hitting 2018 had to make the decision to take him out of league action for the first half much easier. Once activated, he was solid at Peoria, but short of his season-opening 2018 success there with the bat. That is not a step forward, but just approaching a prior level of performance.

A month later, Yepez received his second shot at Palm Beach, the level that did him in during the majority of 2018. He had a good, not great July in terms of his slash line (.275/.351/.431/.782) for the Beach Birds and was very productive, with 20 RBI in 29 games. At that point, he became a corner outfielder more than a corner infielder. Then again, part of the reason may have been the fact that a better first base prospect, Luken Baker, was already with Palm Beach.

In a surprise (to me), when Springfield needed injury backfill help for the final month of the season, Yepez received the call rather than Baker. While the two had about the same career experience at high-A at that point, roughly 100 games, Yepez had only those most recent 29 games of strong results at the level. In all fairness, Baker’s 2019 was not exceptional, such that his results screamed “promotion”. I just figured player development would have wanted to get him out of Palm Beach.

Not surprisingly, Yepez did not excel in his first shot at Springfield in August, not that I am penalizing him for that. But to summarize, he only played three months in 2019 after practicing for two months. One month was good, but at a level he already mastered a season and a half earlier. The middle month was great – at a level at which he previously struggled for four months in 2018. Yepez was challenged at Double-A to close the season and did not take off.

That one great month while repeating the high-A level isn’t enough for me to rank Yepez in the vicinity of the Cardinals top 30 future MLB prospects, as did my peer voters. Hence, my score dragged him down to this overall no. 40. My reminder is that he has had good months before, only to regress.

To double check, I recently (after the season) asked a Midwest League scout about Yepez. “He has a long swing and I don’t like his approach at the plate,” was the reply I received. But maybe that was about the old Yepez, not the current one. Perhaps his inconsistency is in the past. After all, he does not turn 22 years of age until February, with more career twists and turns and opportunities still ahead.

I currently have Yepez’ scouting grade at “3.5”, between an up and down player and spot starter, with moderate work yet ahead to achieve it (“medium” risk).

Link to Yepez’ career stats


Our 2020 top 50 series continues

To see the entire list of top Cardinals prospects and remaining article schedule, click here. This includes the top 50 countdown and 11 in-depth, follow-up articles coming up at the rate of one article per day into January.

Most of them are exclusively for members of The Cardinal Nation. If you are not a member, join today so you do not miss out!

50 Days, 50 Nights, 50 St. Louis Cardinals Prospects – 2020

Also, please participate in the daily discussion about each prospect at The Cardinal Nation’s free message board.


Bonus for members of The Cardinal Nation

The Cardinal Nation’s 2019 Rule 5 Protection Picks


Not yet a member?

If you enjoyed this article, please consider joining The Cardinal Nation to receive the most comprehensive coverage of the St. Louis Cardinals from the majors through the entire minor league system.

© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

TCN 2020 St. Louis Cardinals Prospect #45 – Max Schrock

photo: Max Schrock (Frank Ramirez/The Cardinal Nation)

The Cardinal Nation’s top 50 prospect countdown for 2020 continues with the second infielder who came over from Oakland in the Stephen Piscotty trade. Max Schrock is heading into his third Triple-A season facing increased competition. FREE article.


2019 rank Pos. DOB Ht. Wt. Bat Thw Signed Round R5/Opt MLB debut
27 2B 10 12 94 5-9 195 L R 2015 13 (Was) 2018 2021

Link to Max Schrock’s player page at The Cardinal Nation, with additional biography and history information.

Max Schrock


Selected 2019 stats

Tm AVG BABIP G AB R H 2B HR RBI BB SO SB wRC+ OBP SLG OPS
Mem 0.275 0.332 85 265 42 73 20 2 31 37 49 12 89 0.366 0.381 0.747

TCN Scouting Grade: 3, Risk: low (click here to review scales)


Staff comments (individual rankings in parentheses)

Message board community (44): After the Cardinals obtained Schrock in December of 2017, he slotted in the #15 spot (ahead of both Edmundo Sosa and Tommy Edman) in the TCN’s 2018 ranking after a successful season at Double-A Midland (OAK). The Cards sent him to Triple-A, but after a less than impressive 2018 season, Schrock dropped to #25 in the 2019 community vote. The TCN final poll placed him at #27.

This past season, Schrock continued to battle injuries (four trips to the IL since August 2018). The organization did get him to add some versatility by playing him primarily at third base in 2019, almost required in the system. He also improved his batting average to .275.

As other prospects passed him by, the participants in the Group also sensed a decline in his potential and put him at #44. NigelT was first to select Max at #36 and commented, “I have seen him look sharp at the plate with surprising pop.” PugsleyAddams and desmetlax12 also had him in the #35-38 round. Desmetlax noted that Schrock had a .366 OBP at Memphis and that he made a “Nice jump in BB rate from a career 6% to 12% this past year, which helped with his improvement to a .366 OBP after a poor .296 his first time through Triple-A. Played this season at 24 so still at a good age for this level.” – John Baker


Derek Shore (40): After a disappointing 2018 season, Schrock put together a bounceback 2019, albeit when he was on the field healthy.

Schrock had three different stints on the injured list, but still managed to post a solid slash line of .275/.366/.381 over 85 games at Triple-A Memphis in 2019. The 25-year-old collected 20 doubles, one triple and slugged two homers while driving in 31 runs.

From a scouting standpoint, Schrock doesn’t get the same reviews from scouts that he did in the past.

“He is sort of meh everything,” one scout said last year.

His skill-set is extremely dependent on having a quality approach at the plate and drilling strikes. That was his calling card before he came over to the Cardinals in the Stephen Piscotty trade almost two years ago, but he has fallen out of it since then.

While Schrock has maintained his strikeout to walk numbers throughout his professional career, scouts said his pitch recognition skills have regressed and there is little in the way of impact contact.

He has the speed and instincts to swipe the occasional bag. However, he always had a strong hit tool and could be an above-average hitter at the major-league level.

But his days of becoming an everyday player are gone – at least with the Cardinals. His best chance at reaching the big-leagues is as a utility-player.

In 2019, he played mostly third base and also saw time at his natural position at second and in left field as well.

Expect to see Schrock back at Memphis again in 2020 – for his third go-around at the Pacific Coast League.


Brian Walton (48): I am the least optimistic of our voters about Schrock. As noted above, when he was acquired from Oakland as part of the Stephen Piscotty trade, we slotted him into our top prospect list at no. 15, just one spot behind the other new Cardinal in that deal, Yairo Muñoz.

Based on their reputations and a long conversation I had about the two with Melissa Lockard, A’s minor league expert (and now with The Athletic), I pegged Schrock’s ceiling at 5.5 – somewhere between an average and above-average MLB starter.

Two years later, that seems highly unlikely. Granted, Muñoz was the more experienced of the two, but he continued to progress to the point he has established himself as a solid MLB reserve.

On the other hand, Schrock is stuck in neutral as other infielders whiz by him. When he was acquired, his carrying tool was his hit tool. Much was made – here and elsewhere – about the fact that through Double-A, Schrock had always batted over .300 and was a perennial league all-star.

Well, that ended with the trade. Even in the hitter-friendly Pacific Coast League, Schrock had a mediocre first season with Memphis. Given all the change – of organizations and leagues and all – it was reasonable to give him a mulligan for 2018.

Last winter, the Cardinals left Schrock unprotected in the Rule 5 draft and he was not selected. The bloom was officially off the rose.

The problem is that his 2019 was not better enough. Instead of hitting 37 percent below the average PCL hitter, he was only 11 percent worse last season. (89 wRC+ vs. 63). One positive was an improved second half.

As noted above, he increased his walk percentage substantially in 2019 (seven percent). What was not mentioned, however, was an even bigger spike in his strikeout rate (eight percent). While Schrock has maintained a strong on-base mark over his career, his power has always been very limited. So adding third base is good for his defensive portfolio, his bat isn’t enough for a hot corner regular.

Schrock will almost certainly be left exposed in the upcoming Rule 5 and not be chosen again. That means he will be back with the Redbirds for a third consecutive season, but still without a 40-man roster spot.

My projected Memphis infield to open 2020 will be very crowded, with 40-man players Elehuris Montero (to be added), Edmundo Sosa, Ramon Urias the likely every-day starters at third, short and second, respectively. Evan Mendoza, also still considered a better prospect, is going to be in the scrum, as will Kramer Robertson and others.

That will likely leave Schrock scrambling to scrounge at-bats as a reserve and further decreasing his already shrinking odds of reaching St. Louis. As noted, he doesn’t hit enough to play at third in the bigs and isn’t going to displace Muñoz, let alone Tommy Edman or Kolten Wong, at second.

I have lowered Schrock’s ceiling to a “3”, an up and down player, with minimal work yet ahead to achieve it (“low” risk). At this point, the forecast is what it is – cloudy.

Link to Schrock’s career stats


Our 2020 top 50 series continues

To see the entire list of top Cardinals prospects and remaining article schedule, click here. This includes the top 50 countdown and 11 in-depth, follow-up articles coming up at the rate of one article per day into January.

Most of them are exclusively for members of The Cardinal Nation. If you are not a member, join today so you do not miss out!

50 Days, 50 Nights, 50 St. Louis Cardinals Prospects – 2020

Also, please participate in the daily discussion about each prospect at The Cardinal Nation’s free message board.


Bonus for members of The Cardinal Nation

The Cardinal Nation’s 2019 Rule 5 Protection Picks


Not yet a member?

If you enjoyed this article, please consider joining The Cardinal Nation to receive the most comprehensive coverage of the St. Louis Cardinals from the majors through the entire minor league system.

© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Mike Shildt is the 2019 National League Manager of the Year

photo: Mike Shildt (Jeff Curry/USA TODAY Sports)

St. Louis Cardinals press release

St. Louis Cardinals Manager Mike Shildt was named this evening (Tuesday, November 12) as the recipient of the 2019 National League Manager of the Year Award as voted on by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA).  Shildt, who this season guided the Cardinals to their first N.L. Central title since 2015, joins Hall of Fame managers Whitey Herzog (1985) and Tony La Russa (2002) as Cardinals recipients of the BBWAA award.

Mike Shildt (Steve Mitchell/Imagn)

Shildt guided the Cardinals to a share of their 12th N.L. Central title in his first full season at the helm, overseeing a transformation of the team’s defense with record-setting performances, as the Cardinals became the first Major League team in history to go from worst to first in errors in back-to-back seasons.  The Cardinals went 91-71 in 2019 while advancing to the N.L. Championship Series, and are 132-99 (.571 winning pct.) under Shildt since he was named interim manager on July 15, 2018.

“We are extremely happy for ‘Shildty’ for having been voted the recipient of this well-deserved honor,” stated Cardinals’ President of Baseball Operations John Mozeliak. “Mike and his staff are extremely committed to providing Cardinals fans with a winning style of play that is focused on all facets of the game, and it showed thru this past season.”

Having first joined the Cardinals organization in 2004 as an Area Scout, Shildt advanced thru the team’s player development system, and managed his teams to minor league championships in 2010 and 2011 at rookie-level Johnson City and in 2012 at Springfield of the Texas League (AA).   Shildt was named the Appalachian League Manager of the Year in 2010, the same year he was honored as the recipient of the Cardinals George Kissell Award for excellence in player development.

Shildt, 51, was signed last week to a new three-year contract that extends thru the 2022 season.


Baseball Writers’ Association of America press release

Here are the voting results of the 2019 National League Manager of the Year Award. Ballots from two writers in each league city prior to postseason play are tabulated on a system that rewards five points for first place, three points for second place and one point for third place.

Manager Team 1st 2nd 3rd Points
Mike Shildt Cardinals 10 14 3 95
Craig Counsell Brewers 13 6 5 88
Brian Snitker Braves 3 6 12 45
Dave Roberts Dodgers 4 1 2 25
Dave Martinez Nationals 3 6 15
Torey Lovullo Diamondbacks 2 2

This was only the second election in Manager of the Year voting history in which the winner did not receive the most first-place votes. The only other time was in the American League in 1995 when the Mariners ’Lou Piniella had nine first-place votes to 11 for the Red Sox’ Kevin Kennedy but won on total points, 86-74.

Shildt is the first Manager of the Year Award winner who did not play on the professional level. He is also the eighth winner not to have played in the major leagues. The others were three-time winners Jim Leyland, Joe Maddon and Buck Showalter, two-time winner Jack McKeon as well as Jim Frey, John McNamara and last year’s winner, Brian Snitker, who finished third in this year’s election.

Counsell was the runner-up for the second consecutive year, marking the fourth time in NL voting that a manager ran second two straight years, along with the Reds’ Davey Johnson in 1994 and ’95, the Cardinals’ Tony La Russa in 2004 and ’05 and the Phillies’ Charlie Manuel in 2007 and ’08. In the AL, the Athletics’ Art Howe finished second four consecutive years from 1999-2002. Other AL managers to finish second in consecutive years were the Twins’ Ron Gardenhire two times, in 2003 and ’04 and in 2008 and ’09, and the Royals’ Dick Howser in 1984 and ’85.

It marks the third time a Cardinals manager has been honored. The other St. Louis winners were Whitey Herzog in 1985 and La Russa in 2002.

The Brewers have never had a Manager of the Year winner in either league. In addition to Counsell, other Brewers runners-up were Tom Trebelhorn in 1987 and Phil Garner in 1992 in the AL and Ron Roenicke in 2011 in the NL.

No manager was named on every ballot.

Previous winners:

2018 Brian Snitker, Braves; 2017 Torey Lovullo, Diamondbacks; 2016 Dave Roberts, Dodgers; 2015 Joe Maddon, Cubs; 2014 Matt Williams, Nationals; 2013 Clint Hurdle, Pirates; 2012 Davey Johnson, Nationals; 2011 Kirk Gibson, Diamondbacks; 2010 Bud Black, Padres, 2009 Jim Tracy, Rockies; 2008 Lou Piniella, Cubs; 2007 Bob Melvin, Diamondbacks; 2006 Joe Girardi, Marlins; 2005 Bobby Cox, Braves; 2004 Bobby Cox, Braves; 2003 Jack McKeon, Marlins; 2002 Tony La Russa, Cardinals; 2001 Larry Bowa, Phillies; 2000 Dusty Baker, Giants; 1999 Jack McKeon, Reds; 1998 Larry Dierker, Astros; 1997 Dusty Baker, Giants; 1996 Bruce Bochy, Padres; 1995 Don Baylor, Rockies; 1994 Felipe Alou, Expos; 1993 Dusty Baker, Giants; 1992 Jim Leyland, Pirates; 1991 Bobby Cox, Braves; 1990 Jim Leyland, Pirates; 1989 Don Zimmer, Cubs; 1988 Tommy Lasorda, Dodgers; 1987 Buck Rogers, Expos; 1986 Hal Lanier, Astros; 1985 Whitey Herzog, Cardinals; 1984 Jim Frey, Cubs; 1983 Tommy Lasorda, Dodgers.


TCN 2020 St. Louis Cardinals Prospect #50 – Bryan Dobzanski

photo: Bryan Dobzanski (Springfield Cardinals FANatic Photos)

The Cardinal Nation’s top 50 prospect countdown for 2020 begins with a former big-bonus reliever who earned two promotions last season and could pitch his way into the St. Louis picture next summer. FREE article.


2019 rank Pos. DOB Ht. Wt. Bat Thw Signed Round R5/Opt MLB debut
NR RHR 8 31 95 6-5 230 R R 2014 29th 2018 2020

Link to Bryan Dobzanski’s player page at The Cardinal Nation, with additional biography and history information.

Bryan Dobzanski


Selected 2019 stats

Tm W L ERA FIP G SV SVO IP H ER HR BB SO AVG WHIP G/AO BABIP
PB 1 1 0.89 2.67 19 6 7 20.1 9 2 0 10 23 0.132 0.93 1.77 0.200
Spr 2 1 3.55 4.91 24 2 3 33.0 35 13 6 15 39 0.280 1.52 1.22 0.363
Mem 0 1 7.36 5.71 3 0 0 3.2 2 3 0 5 4 0.154 1.91 0.222
Tot 3 3 2.84 46 8 10 57 46 18 6 30 66 0.223 1.33 1.61

TCN Scouting Grade: 4, Risk: medium (click here to review scales)


Staff comments (individual rankings in parentheses)

Message board community (59): By his #59 ranking by the Community voters, Dobzanski moved up 13 slots (#72) from last year’s tally. Speaking of moving up…. it’s interesting to note that Bryan has made a stop at every Cardinals stateside affiliate in his six-year pro career.

Dobzanski first appeared in the voting at #55 by CariocaCardinal, who added that he wouldn’t be surprised if “Dobz” was taken in the Rule 5 draft. In the very next round, Dobzanski picked up a good amount of support.

He may not have received votes earlier because he arrived late in Memphis (August 28th) and only appeared in three games there – and more likely because he shared a bullpen seat with Kodi Whitley (of newly gained prominence), and vets Jesus Cruz, Chris Ellis and Chasen Shreve. Dobzanski’s Triple-A arrival coincided with St. Louis expanding its roster for September.

Nonetheless, Dobzanski did well enough at both the Double-A and A-Advanced levels during the 2019 season to crack the top 50. Clearly he should have a leg up on other Double-A prospects hoping to move up to Triple-A in 2020. – John Baker


Derek Shore (41): Once Dobzanski transitioned to the bullpen in 2017, he took off and hasn’t looked back since.

Bryan Dobzanski (St. Louis Cardinals)

After putting together a tremendous first full season out of the bullpen in 2018, Dobzanski repeated that success in 2019, reaching Triple-A in the process. He posted a 2.84 ERA over 46 games, striking out 66 batters while converting eight saves in 10 chances across three levels.

His issues as a starter stemmed from trying to be too perfect. At 6-foot-4, 220 pounds, the two-time New Jersey state wrestling champion has athleticism few baseball players possess, yet his fastball sat in the high-80s.

“As a starter, you feel like your responsibility is to go pretty deep,” Dobzanski said. “You pace yourself and not giving everything you have into every pitch. That was the wrong thing to do.”

Springfield pitching coach Darwin Marrero noticed the change in confidence compared to when he had the right-hander as a starter in State College in 2016.

“He is very aggressive,” Marrero said. “He has always been very competitive. His stuff has been growing. He has been maturing. His body is maturing right now. He can coordinate much better than years ago. You can see right now how the ball is coming out of his hand.”

Dobzanski’s heater has ticked up several miles per hour since. It’s an above-average offering at 95-97 mph and his slider has the potential to be an above-average pitch as well. With good control and command, scouts say he has the upside of a seventh-inning reliever.

With confidence and conviction on his side, Dobzanski’s vision for the future has never been clearer.

“I want to attack the offseason and get in the weight room right away, and lift some pretty heavy weight around,” Dobzanski said. “Get stronger and build that lower half. Hopefully, I’ll come back with some more mph on my fastball and a sharper slider.

“Hopefully, I’ll show out in spring training. Whatever happens there or wherever I start, next year my main goal is to end up in the big-leagues at some point. That is the target for me.”


Brian Walton (49): It has been a long haul for Dobzanski to finally return to the top 50 and give us more to talk about than his high school wresting pedigree and related athleticism. That background translated into a huge $700,000 bonus given him in 2014 (despite his 29th-round selection), which was enough cash for him to give up his scholarship to Louisville and play professional baseball instead.

After his solid 2014 debut in the Gulf Coast League, we placed the 6-foot-5, 230-pounder at no. 25 on our 2015 top prospect list. But injury that next season and good-but-not great results in his slow-but-steady progression through the system had put him among the top 50 outsiders-looking-in ever since.

Not everyone is yet convinced.

Bryan Dobzanski (Brian Walton/The Cardinal Nation)

As you could tell by the individual votes above, there is a major difference in view of where Dobzanski currently sits among Cardinals prospects. Derek is attaching considerable significance to the big right-hander’s 2019 improvements, pushing a top 40 placement, while the community has yet to embrace him as a top 50 prospect in the system, barely in the top 60.

My vote is in-between, making it closest to the average. I had considered leaning further into the wind, as he clearly had been on an upward career swing. Dobzanski was our choice as the top-performing reliever in the entire system in 2018 (between Peoria and Palm Beach). Further, some readers may recall that I had identified Dobzanski as an Arizona Fall League candidate back in August. (He was not chosen.)

However, as I dug into Dobzanski’s 2019 numbers, I became a bit less excited about his season and have a better feel why he may not have been sent to the AFL.

From a total workload perspective, nothing stands out. In fact, the former starter pitched the fewest number of innings in 2019 (57) than any time in the last four years. He did make a career-high 46 appearances, though it was only an increase of four over 2018. Dobzanski has been reliable and durable, having never spent a day on the injured list in his six-year professional career.

To open the 2019 season, Dobzanski was returned to Palm Beach and continued to dominate, as one would have hoped. In fact, the High-A league honored him with a much-deserved All-Star selection, his second in a row (Midwest League, 2018). He had certainly earned his promotion to Springfield, which was announced on June 8, and did not miss a beat.

Through June and July, he posted an exceptional 1.99 ERA with 26 punchouts over his first 22 2/3 innings (16 appearances) in the Texas League.

Did he tire from there or did Double-A hitters figure him out?

Either way, in his eight August outings, Dobzanski was knocked around – to the tune of a 6.97 ERA (eight earned runs in 10 1/3 innings). League batters posted a composite .357 average against him.

Still, he was given the opportunity to finish the season with Memphis. I won’t read any significance into his rough Triple-A debut, as it was only three games, but unlike his last promotion, Dobzanski was treated rudely (three earned runs in 3 2/3 innings).

Given that finish over the final month at two levels, I can see why the Cardinals did not assign him to the desert and instead sent him home to prepare for what may be his first-ever non-roster invitation to big-league spring camp.

While as noted above, Dobzanski is Rule 5-eligible, I do not project him to be protected or subsequently taken by another organization this December. A strong finish to 2019 might have convinced me otherwise. However, 2020 should provide him the chance to pitch his way into the St. Louis bullpen discussion in the second half.

I consider his ceiling to be a “4”, an MLB reliever, with some work yet ahead to achieve it (“medium” risk).

Link to Dobzanski’s career stats


Our 2020 top 50 series continues

To see the entire list of top Cardinals prospects and remaining article schedule, click here. This includes the top 50 countdown and 11 in-depth, follow-up articles coming up at the rate of one article per day into January.

Most of them are exclusively for members of The Cardinal Nation. If you are not a member, join today so you do not miss out!

50 Days, 50 Nights, 50 St. Louis Cardinals Prospects – 2020

Also, please participate in the daily discussion about each prospect at The Cardinal Nation’s free message board.


Bonus for members of The Cardinal Nation

Kramer Robertson Learned in AFL Even When Not Playing


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© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The Cardinal Nation’s Team Recaps and Top Players of 2019

photo: Andrew Knizner (Frank Ramirez/The Cardinal Nation)

Continuing our 14-year tradition, the staff of The Cardinal Nation will share our recaps of the just-completed season at each level of the St. Louis Cardinals system, including the major league club. We will also crown three award winners for each team – The Cardinal Nation Minor League Starting Pitchers, Relievers and Players of the Year.

We will unveil our selections, one team recap or award per day, every day, beginning on Monday, September 16, and continuing into early November. Club recaps are first, then the Dominican Summer League (DSL) Red Reliever of the Year and all the way through the Memphis Redbirds Player of the Year.

Several special awards will be added and of course, our top selections for the entire Cardinals minor league system for 2019 as well as the best-performing rookies follow. The minor league section of the series will conclude with our choice as the top manager in the organization before we break down the big-league club’s top players and regular season and post-season results, if applicable.

Those at the keyboard are our team of locally-based reporters – covering every Cardinals minor league affiliate first-hand – as they select the very best of the best at each level and overall, from over 300 players.

They include Frank Ramirez (Memphis), Derek Shore (Springfield), Blake Newberry (Palm Beach), Satchel Perlowski (Peoria), Nick Mazone (State College), Cole Sams (Johnson City) and Paul Ivice (Gulf Coast League). Veteran TCN analyst Leonda Markee will recap 2019 for the two DSL clubs.

Note: While the team reports and all winning names will be made available to everyone as this master article is updated daily, the detailed commentary behind most of the player awards in this series will be exclusively for The Cardinal Nation members. All major league articles will again be free for all.

This 49-article series will include analysis from our local reporters as well as comments by scouts, Cardinals players, coaches and executives. We explain what tradeoffs were made and what we saw in the best players to take the field at each level of the Cardinals system during the 2019 season.

Again, we begin the process with a daily series recapping each minor league club’s 2019 season in depth, looking at records, injuries, player movement, key stats and much more. Once they are published, you can click on the highlighted team names below to read those articles if you missed them the first time.

2019 The Cardinal Nation/Scout.com Award Winners/Schedule

Minor League System
Free articles Member articles Member articles Member articles
2019 Team Recaps Top Relief Pitcher Top Starting Pitcher Top Position Player
Dominican Red (Rk)  Luis Garcia Angel Cuenca Diowill Burgos
Dominican Blue (Rk) Victor Villanueva Gustavo J. Rodriguez Darlin Moquete
Gulf Coast (Rk) Connor Coward Ludwin Jimenez Patrick Romeri
Johnson City (SS-R) Will Guay Michael YaSenka Chandler Redmond
State College (SS-A) Jack Ralston Enmanuel Solano Pedro Pages
Peoria (A) Edgar Escobar Kyle Leahy Brady Whalen
Palm Beach (A+) Ramon Santos Alex FaGalde Justin Toerner
Springfield (AA) Kodi Whitley Angel Rondon Dylan Carlson
Memphis (AAA) Chasen Shreve Daniel Ponce de Leon Randy Arozarena
Minor League System
Member articles Member articles Member articles Member articles
Top System Players Top Relief Pitcher Top Starting Pitcher Top Position Player
Rookies of the Year Jack Ralston Michael YaSenka Chandler Redmond
Players of the Year Junior Fernandez Angel Rondon Randy Arozarena
Emerging Players of the Year Wilfredo Pereira Ivan Herrera
Comeback Player of the Year Alvaro Seijas Juan Yepez
Manager of the Year Roberto Espinoza
St. Louis
Free articles Free articles Free articles Free articles
Top Players Rookie of the Year
Tommy Edman
Top Relief Pitcher Top Starting Pitcher Top Position Player
Giovanny Gallegos Jack Flaherty Kolten Wong
StL Team Recaps
Regular Season
Regular season by the Numbers
Post-season

Click on the player name highlighted in the table above to be taken to that detailed article. In addition, select each team name to read the 2019 overall summary for that level.

Then, join the daily discussion at The Cardinal Nation’s free message board, as each selection is unveiled.

If you ever forget the location of this article, you can always use the permanent link on The Cardinal Nation homepage. Underneath the site logo in the left column, click on “Season Recaps/Top Players”, and select the year.

Our annual Cardinals Top 50 Prospect Ranking countdown will begin in late November after this series concludes. Please remember that the two processes are separate and distinct.

This effort is to recognize the top performances on the field in 2019, whether or not the players are projected to have a major league future down the road. In other words, this is all about current year results at the assigned level of play, not future potential.


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© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Cardinals Announce Contract Extensions for Mozeliak, Girsch and Shildt

photo: Michael Girsch, Bill DeWitt Jr., Mike Shildt, John Mozeliak (Jeff Curry/Imagn)

The St. Louis Cardinals made several announcements today (Tuesday, November 5) during an afternoon press conference at Busch Stadium, including contract extensions for President Of Baseball Operations John Mozeliak, Vice President & General Manager Michael Girsch and Manager Mike Shildt.

“Mo and his staff have helped to consistently guide our organization over the past 12 seasons, and after some recent close finishes, we were excited to see the team win the N.L. Central this season, and advance to the League Championship Series,” stated Cardinals’ Chairman Bill DeWitt, Jr.  “I’m pleased to announce today that Mo has agreed to continue to the lead our baseball operations into the next decade.”

Mozeliak, who joined the Cardinals organization in 1995, served as Senior Vice President & General Manager from October of 2007 to June of 2017, when he was promoted to the newly–created position of President of Baseball Operations.  The Cardinals have advanced to the postseason in seven of their 12 seasons under Mozeliak, including two N.L. Championships and a World Series title in 2011.  The Cardinals 73 postseason games during Mozeliak’s tenure are 2nd most in the majors, trailing only the Dodgers (82).

“I’m personally excited to remain with the Cardinals organization and thrilled to continue to lead our baseball operations group,’ stated Mozeliak.  “We will continue to explore all avenues to make sure the Cardinals remain at the forefront as our Game continues to evolve.”

Girsch, who was named V.P. & General Manager in June of 2017, and has been a member of the Cardinals organization since 2006, oversaw the team’s first division title since 2015 this past season.

Shildt, named yesterday as a finalist for this BBWAA N.L. Manager of the Year Award, guided the team to a share of its 12th N.L. Central title in his first full season at the helm, overseeing a transformation of the team’s defense with record-setting performances, as the Cardinals became the first Major League team in history to go from worst to first in errors in back-to-back seasons.  The Cardinals are 132-99 (.571 winning pct.) under Shildt since he was named interim manager on July 15, 2018.  His new three-year contract extends thru the 2022 season.

The Cardinals also announced today that the entire Major League coaching staff will return in 2020; Hitting Coach Jeff Albert, First Base Coach Stubby Clapp, Bullpen Coach Bryan Eversgerd, Assistant Hitting Coach Jobel Jimenez, Pitching Coach Mike Maddux, Bench Coach Oliver Marmol, Coach Willie McGee and Third Base Coach Ron “Pop” Warner.

The team also announced a number of promotions within their Baseball Operations staff today:

  • Jeremy Cohen – Senior Director, Baseball Development;
  • Kevin Seats – Baseball Analytics Director;
  • Patrick Casanta – Systems Director;
  • Matt Bayer – Project Director;
  • Javier Duran – Coordinator, Technology & Innovation;
  • Tyler Hadzinsky – Assistant Director of Scouting

In their words


Updates

Mozeliak is under contract through 2023, with Girsch and Shildt to be paid through 2022. The team tore up the final year of Shildt’s old contract with the new one covering the next three years.

In a November 25 chat, Derrick Goold also disclosed that the contract of scouting director Randy Flores has been extended through at least 2021 and other front office members have received extensions, as well.


For more

Join the contract extension discussion (and other Cardinals-related topics) at The Cardinal Nation’s free forum.


Bonus for members of The Cardinal Nation

TCN’s 2019 Cardinals Emerging Pitcher of the Year


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Simmons Gets Another Chance at Hall of Fame

photo: Ted Simmons (Getty Images)

Baseball Hall of Fame press release

Nine former big league players and one executive comprise the 10-name Modern Baseball Era ballot to be reviewed and voted upon Dec. 8 at the Baseball Winter Meetings in San Diego, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum announced today.

Ted Simmons, 1972 (Getty Images)

Dwight Evans, Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Marvin Miller, Thurman Munson, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons and Lou Whitaker are the candidates the Modern Baseball Era Committee will consider for Hall of Fame election for the Class of 2020. All candidates are former players except for Miller, who was the head of the Major League Baseball Players Association from 1966-82. All candidates except for Miller and Munson are living.

The results of the Modern Baseball Era Committee vote will be announced live on MLB Network’s “MLB Tonight” at 8 p.m. ET on Sunday, Dec. 8.

Any candidate who receives votes on 75 percent of the ballots cast by the 16-member Modern Baseball Era Committee will earn election to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and will be inducted in Cooperstown on July 26, 2020, along with any electees who emerge from the 2020 Baseball Writers’ Association of America election, to be announced on Jan. 21, 2020.

The Modern Baseball Era is one of four Era Committees, each of which provide an avenue for Hall of Fame consideration to managers, umpires and executives, as well as players retired for more than 15 seasons.

The 10 Modern Baseball Era finalists were selected by the BBWAA-appointed Historical Overview Committee from all eligible candidates among managers, umpires, executives and players whose most significant career impact was realized during the time period from 1970 through 1987. Eligible candidates include: Players who played in at least 10 major league seasons and have been retired for 15 or more seasons; and managers, umpires and executives with 10 or more years in baseball. All active executives age 70 or older may have their careers reviewed as part of the Era Committee balloting process, regardless of the position they hold in an organization, and regardless of whether their body of work has been completed. All candidates must not be on Baseball’s Ineligible List.

The Modern Baseball Era ballot was determined this fall by the Historical Overview Committee, comprised of 11 veteran historians: Bob Elliott (formerly Toronto Sun); Jim Henneman (formerly Baltimore Sun); Rick Hummel (St. Louis Post-Dispatch); Steve Hirdt (formerly Elias Sports Bureau); Bill Madden (formerly New York Daily News); Jack O’Connell (BBWAA); Jim Reeves (formerly Fort Worth Star-Telegram); Tracy Ringolsby (MLB.com); Glenn Schwarz (formerly San Francisco Chronicle); Dave van Dyck (formerly Chicago Tribune); and Mark Whicker (Los Angeles News Group).

The 16-member Hall of Fame Board-appointed electorate charged with the review of the Modern Baseball Era ballot will be announced later this fall. The Modern Baseball Era electorate will meet to discuss and review the candidacies of the 10 finalists as part of Baseball’s Winter Meetings on Dec. 8 in San Diego.

The Modern Baseball Era Committee meets twice in any five-year period, with the next meeting scheduled for the fall of 2022.

The 10 candidates for Modern Baseball Era consideration for the Class of 2020:

  • Dwight Evans played 19 seasons with the Red Sox and one with the Orioles, totaling 385 home runs and 1,384 RBI at the plate while winning eight Gold Glove Awards in right field. A three-time All-Star and two-time Silver Slugger Award winner, Evans posted a .370 career on-base percentage and is one of only 34 players all-time with at least 1,300 runs scored, 1,300 RBI and 1,300 walks.
  • Steve Garvey compiled a .294 career average over 19 major league seasons with the Dodgers and Padres, amassing 2,599 hits, 272 home runs, 1,308 RBI and 10 All-Star Game selections. He hit .338 with 11 home runs and 31 RBI in 11 postseason series, was named the 1978 and 1984 NLCS MVP and won the 1981 Roberto Clemente Award.  The 1974 NL Most Valuable Player, Garvey won four Gold Glove Awards and played in an NL record 1,207 straight games at first base.
  • Tommy John pitched 26 seasons for the Indians, White Sox, Dodgers, Yankees, Angels and A’s, finishing his career after the 1989 season with a record of 288-231 and 3.34 ERA. His 700 career starts rank eighth on the all-time list and his 4,710.1 innings rank 20th all-time. A four-time All-Star Game selection – three of which came following his groundbreaking elbow surgery in 1974 – John won the 1976 Hutch Award and 1981 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award.
  • Don Mattingly played 14 seasons for the Yankees, batting .307 with 222 home runs and 2,153 hits. A six-time All-Star and nine-time Gold Glove Award winner at first base, Mattingly led the American League in total bases in both 1985 and 1986, won the 1984 AL batting title, captured three Silver Slugger Awards and was named the 1985 AL Most Valuable Player.
  • Marvin Miller was elected as the head of the Major League Baseball Players Association in 1966 and quickly turned the union into a powerhouse. Within a decade of being named head of the union, Miller had secured free agency for the players. By the time he retired in 1982, the average player salary was approximately 10 times what it was when he took over.
  • Thurman Munson played for 11 seasons with the Yankees, winning the American League Rookie of the Year Award in 1970 and the American League Most Valuable Player Award in 1976. A seven-time All-Star and three-time Gold Glove Award winner, Munson is one of only two catchers in history with three consecutive seasons with at least a .300 batting average, 180 hits and 100 RBI.
  • Dale Murphy played 18 seasons with the Braves, Phillies and Rockies, winning back-to-back National League Most Valuable Player Awards in 1982 and 1983. A seven-time All-Star, Murphy won five Gold Glove Awards and four Silver Slugger Awards in center field. Murphy finished his career with 398 home runs and 1,266 RBI.
  • Dave Parker compiled a .290 career average over 19 major league seasons with six teams, including 11 years in Pittsburgh and four years in Cincinnati, and amassed 339 home runs, 1,493 RBI and two batting titles (1977-78). The 1978 NL Most Valuable Player was named to seven All-Star games and won three Gold Glove Awards in right field.
  • Ted Simmons played for 21 seasons, totaling a .285 batting average, 2,472 hits, 483 doubles, 248 home runs and 1,389 RBI primarily as a catcher for the Cardinals, Brewers and Braves. An eight-time All-Star, he garnered MVP votes seven times in his career and finished among his league’s top 10 players in batting average six times.
  • Lou Whitaker played 19 seasons, all with the Tigers, compiling 2,369 hits, 244 home runs and 1,197 walks. A five-time All-Star and four-time Silver Slugger Award winner, Whitaker won three Gold Glove Awards for his play at second base. The 1978 American League Rookie of the Year, Whitaker never played a game in the field at any position other than second base.

More information on each candidate is available by visiting baseballhall.org/modern-baseball-era-ballot-2020.

About the Era Committees

The Era Committees consist of four different electorates: Today’s Game (for candidates whose greatest contributions to baseball were realized from 1988 to the present); Modern Baseball (for candidates whose greatest contributions to baseball were realized from 1970 to 1987); Golden Days (for candidates whose greatest contributions to baseball were realized from 1950 to 1969); and Early Baseball (for candidates whose greatest contributions to baseball were realized prior to 1950).

The Today’s Game and Modern Baseball eras are considered twice each in a five-year period, with the Golden Days era considered once every five years and the Early Baseball era considered once every 10 years. The Today’s Game era was considered in the fall of 2018, with Harold Baines and Lee Smith earning Hall of Fame election.

Eras considered for yearly induction over the next decade are as follows: 2021 – Both Golden Days and Early Baseball; 2022 – Today’s Game; 2023 – Modern Baseball; 2024 – Today’s Game; 2025 – Modern Baseball; 2026 – Golden Days. The Early Baseball era returns for induction consideration in 2031.

Both the ballot and electorate are created anew with each cycle for consideration. The four separate electorates consider by era a single composite ballot of managers, umpires, executives and long-retired players.


For more

Join the Hall of Fame discussion (and other Cardinals-related topics) at The Cardinal Nation’s free forum.


Bonus for members of The Cardinal Nation

TCN’s 2019 Cardinals Comeback Pitcher of the Year


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© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Flaherty Repeats as National League Pitcher of the Month

photo: Jack Flaherty (Jeff Curry/Imagn)

St. Louis Cardinals release

Jack Flaherty named the National League Pitcher of the Month for the second consecutive month

Jack Flaherty (Steve Mitchell/Imagn)

How did he do it?

  • Registered a 3-1 record with 53 strikeouts and a 0.82 ERA across six starts, while limiting the opposition to 17 hits and eight walks. Permitted just a pair of home runs.
  • Concluded the regular season with 7.0 scoreless innings and six strikeouts against the Chicago Cubs in his start yesterday. Logged four scoreless starts with at least 7.0 innings pitched over the course of his dominant month.
  • In the second half of the season, compiled a 7-2 record with 124 strikeouts, 23 walks and a 0.91 ERA over 99.1 innings pitched and 15 starts. Became the first Major League pitcher since 1915 to record at least 120 strikeouts while posting an ERA of 1.00-or-better in the second half of a season.
  • Finished his breakout campaign with an 11-8 record to go along with 231 strikeouts, 55 walks and a 2.75 ERA. Since 1885, became the third pitcher younger than 24 years old to post a season in which he tallied at least 230 punchouts while permitting 55-or-fewer walks to go along with an ERA of 2.75-or-better, joining Clayton Kershaw (2011) and Mark Prior (2003).

Vote Now for Your 2020 St. Louis Cardinals Top Prospects

With the close of the minor league season, it is time for fans to get off the sidelines and participate in selecting The Cardinal Nation’s St. Louis Cardinals Top 50 Prospect List for 2020.

Our message board community has begun its 14th-annual selection process of the top prospects in the Cardinals minor league system as voted upon by you, our readers.

The process is easy and anyone can participate. Join the discussion on a special thread on The Cardinal Nation’s free message board.

It begins with a community vote for prospect no. 1, which is currently open. Just make a post specifying your choice. After about 36 hours of voting, the player with the simple majority of votes cast will be proclaimed the winner. Balloting for the next prospect follows and so on. To respect everyone’s time, the process keeps moving.

In addition to being the first Cardinals prospect list of its kind, the community voting will again be included in the blended tabulation of the official The Cardinal Nation Top 50 Prospect List for 2020. Its annual roll-out will begin shortly before Thanksgiving and continue into the New Year.

Our top prospect lists back to 2006 can be viewed via links located off The Cardinal Nation’s home page. Underneath the site logo in the left, red menu bar, click on “PROSPECT RANKINGS”.

To current TCN members, thank you very much for your business, but you do not need to be a subscriber to participate in the top prospect voting.


Bonus for members of The Cardinal Nation

Memphis Redbirds Notebook – 2019 Week 22


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© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Cardinals Name Garcia, Ponce de Leon System’s Best in August

photo: Daniel Ponce de Leon (Frank Ramirez/The Cardinal Nation)

St. Louis Cardinals press release

The St. Louis Cardinals announced today (Wednesday, September 4) their selections for Minor League Player and Pitcher of the Month for August, with Memphis Redbirds (AAA) outfielder Adolis Garcia and Memphis right-hander Daniel Ponce de Leon taking the honors.

García, 26, clubbed seven of his team-leading 32 home runs in August, while batting .342 (25-for-73)  with 24 runs scored and 19 RBI in 24 games.  The right-handed hitting Garcia finished the 2019 season with a .253 batting mark, ranked 8th in the Pacific Coast League in home runs, 10th in RBI (96) and 8th in runs scored (96).

García, a Cuba native, who was signed by the Cardinals as an international free-agent in February of 2017, led the league in games played with 132.  His 32 round-trippers tied Rick Ankiel (2007) for the 4th most in Memphis franchise single-season history.

Adolis Garcia

Ponce de Leon, 27, fashioned a perfect 4-0 mark with a 0.93 ERA across his five starts during the month of August, striking out 39 in his 29.0 innings pitched.  Ponce de Leon had a pair of 7.0 inning scoreless starts in August and fanned 11 in a 15-0 win at Sacramento on August 9.

Ponce de Leon made a total of 16 starts for Memphis in 2019, going 8-4 with a 2.88 ERA.   A 9th round draft selection by the Cardinals in 2014, Ponce de Leon has also appeared in 11 games (8 starts) for St. Louis this season (1-2, 4.03 ERA).

Daniel Ponce de Leon

García and Ponce de Leon helped fuel an impressive turn around by Memphis over their season’s final six weeks, as the Redbirds went 31-12 (.721 win pct.) following a loss on July 17 that had left them with a 38-59 mark.  The back-to-back (2017-18) Pacific Coast League Champions went into their final series of the season with a chance to advance to the postseason, before finishing the year at 69-71 and in 2nd place in the PCL American Northern Division.


TCN’s take

The pair already received The Cardinal Nation’s top honors for the month, so of course, we agree!

Ponce de Leon is The Cardinal Nation August Pitcher of the Month

Adolis Garcia Named TCN’s Cardinals Minors August Player of the Month


Bonus for members of The Cardinal Nation

Connor Jones Builds on a Strong Second Half as a Reliever


For more

To track the 25- and 40-man rosters as well as all players in the system by position and level, check out the Roster Matrix, always free and updated here at The Cardinal Nation. Also included is every player transaction across the full organization all year long.


Not yet a member?

Join The Cardinal Nation for the most comprehensive coverage of the St. Louis Cardinals from the majors through the entire minor league system. Annual members may purchase the new 2019 Prospect Guide PDF for less than half price. In addition, our limited edition printed and bound Guides are $5 off, so get yours today!

© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Cardinals with Two NL Award Winners and another Outfielder

photo: Jack Flaherty and Yadier Molina (Jeff Curry/Imagn)

The St. Louis Cardinals have the National League Player of the Week, Yadier Molina, the Pitcher of the Month, Jack Flaherty, and added outfielder Randy Arozarena from Triple-A Memphis.


St. Louis Cardinals Media Notes (Tuesday September 3)

MOLINA IS NL PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Yadier Molina was recognized today as National League Player of the Week for the Aug. 26-Sept. 1 period. The 37-year-old catcher slashed .579/.636/1.368 (11-19) with four homers, three doubles, eight RBI, and a 2.005 OPS in six games played.

This is Molina’s first Player of the Week award of his 16-year career and first by a Cardinal since Paul Goldschmidt (July 22-28, 2019).

Yadier Molina

FLAHERTY IS NL PITCHER OF THE MONTH

Jack Flaherty was recognized today as National League Pitcher of the Month of August after going 4-1 with a 0.71 ERA and 47 strikeouts in six starts, while limiting the opposition to 19 hits and nine walks. The 23-year-old right-hander ranked among August NL leaders in wins (4, T1st), ERA (0.71, 1st), innings (38.0, T3rd), strikeouts (47, T3rd), opp. AVG (.145, 2nd), and WHIP (0.74, 1st).

Flaherty is the first Cardinal to win Pitcher of the Month since Adam Wainwright in September 2014.

Jack Flaherty

AROZARENA JOINS ST. LOUIS

Prior to tonight’s game, outfielder Randy Arozarena was recalled from Memphis (AAA) to become the 35th player on the Cardinals active roster. Arozarena, 24, made his Major League debut this season, previously appearing in three games for St. Louis in August.

Randy Arozarena


For more

To track the 25- and 40-man rosters as well as all players in the system by position and level, check out the Roster Matrix, always free and updated here at The Cardinal Nation. Also included is every player transaction across the full organization all year long.


For Members of The Cardinal Nation

State College Spikes Notebook – 2019 Week 11


Not yet a member?

Join The Cardinal Nation for the most comprehensive coverage of the St. Louis Cardinals from the majors through the entire minor league system. Annual members may purchase the new 2019 Prospect Guide PDF for less than half price. In addition, our limited edition printed and bound Guides are $5 off, so get yours today!

© 2019 The Cardinal Nation, thecardinalnation.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

St. Louis Cardinals Announce 2020 Schedule

St. Louis Cardinals press release

The St. Louis Cardinals, in conjunction with Major League Baseball’s league-wide release, today (Monday, August 12) announced their 2020 regular season schedule.  The home opener for the Redbirds is set for Thursday, April 2 against the Baltimore Orioles as part of a seven-game home stand with Baltimore (April 2, 4-5) and the Los Angeles Dodgers (April 6-9).

The Cardinals will open their 2020 season on the road with a three-game series at Cincinnati against the division rival Reds beginning on Thursday, March 26, followed by a three-game series at Milwaukee (March 30-April 1).

Among the key home dates for 2020 are a weekend series visit July 17-19 by the New York Yankees, who will be visiting Busch Stadium for the first time since 2014, a July series with the Brewers over the Independence Day holiday weekend (July 3-5) and a four-game weekend series with the Cubs (July 23-26).   The Cubs will also visit St. Louis for a four-game weekend series September 10-13.

The Cardinals will host the Cubs in London, England for a two-game series June 13-14, the team’s first ever regular season “Home” games outside of St. Louis.  Because of the two-game international London Series, the Cardinals will play 79 games in St. Louis in 2020 with their final home games September 21-23 vs. Milwaukee.

The 2020 season will feature 26 home series and 26 road series, including 13 weekend series at Busch Stadium: April 2, 4-5 vs. Baltimore,  April 24-26 vs. Miami,  May 8-10 vs New York Mets, May 22-24 vs. Arizona, May 29-31 vs. Pittsburgh, June 19-21 vs. Cincinnati, July 3-5 vs. Milwaukee, July 17-19 vs. New York Yankees, July 23-26 vs. Chicago Cubs, August 7-9 vs. Cincinnati, August 14-16 vs. Milwaukee,  August 28-30 vs. Pittsburgh and September 10-13 vs. Chicago Cubs.

The Cardinals 20-game interleague schedule will feature a pair of two-game home-and-home series with in-state rival Kansas City (August 4-5 at Kansas City & September 15-16 at Busch Stadium) and with the Toronto Blue Jays (June 1-2 at Busch Stadium & August 18-19 at Toronto).  In addition, the Cardinals will host three-game home interleague series against the Orioles (April 2, 4-5) and Yankees (July 17-19), and will play three-game road series at Boston (June 26-28) and at Tampa Bay (July 10-12).

The Cardinals are scheduled to play 46 of their 81 home games before the July 13-16 All-Star Break, playing 13 home games in April, 16 in May, 12 in June, 15 in July, 13 in August and 12 in September.  The Cardinals are scheduled to play holiday weekend home games Memorial Day weekend (May 22-24 vs. Arizona) and Independence Day weekend (July 3-5 vs. Milwaukee).

The Cardinals longest home stand of the 2020 season consists of 10 games (July 17-26) with the Yankees (three games), San Francisco Giants (three games) and Chicago Cubs (four games).  Their longest road trips consist of two 10-game trips April 10-19 and July 27-August 5.  Following their return from London, the Cardinals will play 20 consecutive games without a day off from June 16-July 5 (13 home games & seven road games).

The March 26 season opener will be the earliest in franchise history and the April 2 home opener will be the first ever against Baltimore and the first ever for the Cardinals against an American League opponent.

The Cardinals will make future announcements regarding game times, ticket pricing and ticket availability for the 2020 season.  To view the full 2020 regular season schedule, visit cardinals.com.

Link to downloadable one-page schedule

https://content.mlb.com/documents/5/5/4/309912554/2020_schedule.pdf

Goldschmidt Named July National League Player of the Month

photo: Paul Goldschmidt (Billy Hurst/Imagn)

MLB Press Release (extracted)

Paul Goldschmidt (Steve Mitchell/Imagn)

First baseman Paul Goldschmidt of the St. Louis Cardinals has been voted the National League Player of the Month for July, and first baseman Yuli Gurriel of the Houston Astros has been named the American League Player of the Month.

Goldschmidt earned his second career monthly award, previously winning in June 2018 while a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks. Paul is the first Cardinals player to claim the NL Player of the Month Award since his teammate Matt Carpenter in July 2018. It marks the first time since Miguel Cabrera and Freddie Freeman in September 2016 that a pair of first basemen won Players of the Month.

Paul Goldschmidt, St. Louis Cardinals

    • Posted a slash line of .308/.360/.725 with 20 runs scored, 28 hits, five doubles, 11 home runs, 27 RBI and eight walks across 25 games played.
    • Was named NL Player of the Week for the period ending July 28th after matching the franchise record shared by Carpenter and Mark McGwire with a home run in six straight games from July 22nd-27th. The streak was tied for the second-longest by a right-handed hitter in MLB history, trailing only Kevin Mench, who logged a seven-game streak from April 21-28, 2006.
    • During his historic streak, homered in each game of St. Louis’ four-game series against the Pirates.
    • Became the first Cardinals player to homer in every game of a four-game set since Ripper Collins in 1935.
    • Became the second player in franchise history to tally at least 11 home runs and 27 RBI while batting .300-or-better in the month of July, joining Jim Edmonds (2004).

     

  • Others receiving votes for NL Player of the Month included July’s NL Rookie of the Month Keston Hiura (.355, 33 H, 10 2B, 6 HR) and All-Star outfielder Christian Yelich (.352, 5 2B, 7 HR, 18 RBI) of the Milwaukee Brewers; third baseman Eugenio Suárez (.289, 19 R, 12 HR, 23 RBI) of the Cincinnati Reds; and third baseman Josh Donaldson (.264, 10 HR, 27 RBI, .655 SLG) of the Atlanta Braves.

Goldschmidt Named National League Player of the Week

photo: Paul Goldschmidt (Billy Hurst/Imagn)

Paul Goldschmidt (Steve Mitchell/Imagn)

Major League Baseball press release (extracted)

First baseman Paul Goldschmidt of the St. Louis Cardinals has been named the W.B. Mason National League Player of the Week (for the period of July 22-28). (Minnesota’s Nelson Cruz is the American League honoree.) The announcements were made earlier today on MLB Network.

Goldschmidt claimed his third career NL Player of the Week Award, most recently doing so last year for the period ending June 19th. Paul is the first Cardinals player this season to accomplish the feat and the first since his teammate Matt Carpenter in 2018 (August 6th).

Goldschmidt highlights:

  • Across seven games played, batted .345 (10-for-29) with nine runs scored, six home runs, 13 RBI, two walks and a .966 slugging percentage.
  • Posted a career-best six-game home run streak from July 22nd-27th, matching the franchise record shared by Carpenter and Mark McGwire. The streak was tied for the second-longest by a right-handed hitter in MLB history, trailing only Kevin Mench, who logged a seven-game streak from April 21-28, 2006.
  • During his historic streak, homered in each game of St. Louis’ four-game series against the Pirates. Became the first Cardinals player to homer in every game of a four-game set since Ripper Collins in 1935.
  • Enters play today with 10 round-trippers thus far in July, which trails only Eugenio Suárez of the Cincinnati Reds for the NL lead. Overall, Goldschmidt is slashing .289/.348/.687 with 19 runs scored, 13 extra-base hits and 26 RBI since the calendar flipped to July.